Greyt Inspirations Life

A little about our life, our business and our pets. www.greytinspirations.com

Chicken Jerky and Onions?

Merry Christmas!  I hope everyone has been having a wonderful time this holiday season.  I hope your pets have been enjoying the season as much as everyone else.  A friend sent me this very funny video  from YouTube of dogs decorating their Christmas tree.  It’s called “A doggy Christmas surprise.”  Very cute and funny.  I think they did a terrific job.

 

 

 

A dog with his bag of jerky.  Flickr

A dog with his bag of jerky. Flickr

Just to catch up on a few pet-related things that have been happening in the last few days, the FDA has issued another warning about feeding your dog chicken jerky products:

 

 

The Food and Drug Administration continues to caution consumers of a potential association between the development of illness in dogs and the consumption of chicken-jerky products also described as chicken tenders, strips or treats. FDA continues to receive complaints of dogs experiencing illness that their owners or veterinarians associate with consumption of chicken-jerky products. The chicken-jerky products are imported to the U.S. from China. FDA issued a cautionary warning to consumers in September 2007…

 

FDA is advising consumers who choose to feed their dogs chicken jerky products to watch their dogs closely for any or all of the following signs which may occur within hours to days of feeding the product: decreased appetite, although some may continue to consume the treats to the exclusion of other foods; decreased activity; vomiting; diarrhea, sometimes with blood; and increased water consumption and/or increased urination. If the dog shows any of these signs, stop feeding the chicken-jerky product. Owners should consult their veterinarian if signs are severe or persist for more than 24 hours. Blood tests may indicate kidney failure (increased urea nitrogen and creatinine). Urine tests may indicate Fanconi syndrome (increased glucose). Although most dogs appear to recover, some reports to the FDA have involved dogs that have died.

 

(From the Orlando Sentinel’s Animal Crazy blog.)

 

Veterinarians and consumers should report cases of animal illness associated with pet foods to the FDA Consumer Complaint Coordinator in their state.  So, if your pet received any chicken jerky products for Christmas it’s a good idea to get rid of them.  Better safe than sorry in this case.

 

In other news, Modern Dog magazine has a nice interview/story about Rachael Ray

Onion breath.  Flickr

Onion breath. Flickr

and how she came to create her own line of dog food.  There has been a little bru-ha-ha about the story because it originally included a recipe from Ray which included onions.  The magazine was hit with tons of comments from readers letting them know that onions were toxic to dogs.  Well, hold on just a minute!  Yes, if you feed your dog lots of raw onions they will probably cause problems (onions have been suggested as a possible cause of autoimmune problems such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia in dogs).  However, if you check out many commercial kibbles, even the the most expensive gourmet brands, you will find that they use small quantities of onions in their recipes.  There are a number of homemade dog food recipes which call for the inclusion of small amounts of onions.  The mere fact that Ms. Ray’s recipe included some onions in it shouldn’t have brought such a knee-jerk response from readers.  They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing and I think that’s true.  All of us with dogs pick up bits and pieces of information and too often we let that be the deciding factor in everything we do for our dogs without finding out better information.

 

 

One of my dogs died from autoimmune hemolytic anemia a few years ago and it is a terrible thing to experience.  He was seven years old and had never been sick a day in his life.  I was in the kitchen when he stood up to get some water and he simply collapsed.  After intensive care at the vet and a couple of trips to the emergency vet’s over the next week, he still died.  We never found a reason for the hemolytic anemia and there was no history of autoimmune problems in his family.  I was talking to my vet a few days ago (a different vet from the one I had then — I’ve moved since then).  She was asking me about his vaccination history.  She said the thinking now is that vaccination reactions may not show up within a few days of getting a dog’s shots.  If he had received his shots within a few weeks or even months of his collapse they could have been related to the autoimmune hemolytic anemia.  She said it takes the body a few weeks to make that kind of over-response to the vaccinations.  But that’s just one theory.  No one really knows what causes it.

 

But before we form a mob and demand Rachael Ray’s head on a platter for including some onions in a dog food recipe, it’s good to know a lot more about onion toxicity.  Read the label on your dog food and you may find that onions are already included.  Garlic is also included in many dog foods and it’s been accused of causing the same problems as onions, yet up until recently many people routinely fed their dogs garlic everyday as a flea preventive.  Many people continue to give their dogs garlic, with no ill effects, and to use it to enhance the flavor of foods for dogs.

Advertisements

December 26, 2008 - Posted by | General | , , , ,

4 Comments »

  1. […] A nice web master placed an observative post today on Chicken Jerky and Onions? Greyt Inspirations LifeHere’s a quick excerpt(From the Orlando Sentinel’s Animal Crazy blog.) Veterinarians and consumers should report cases of animal illness associated with pet foods to the FDA Consumer Complaint Coordinator in their state. So, if your pet received any chicken … […]

    Pingback by Chicken Jerky and Onions? Greyt Inspirations Life | CARE 4 YOUR PET | December 26, 2008 | Reply

  2. […] This chap added an interesting post today on Chicken Jerky and Onions? Greyt Inspirations LifeHere’s a small reading(From the Orlando Sentinel’s Animal Crazy blog.) Veterinarians and consumers should report cases of animal illness associated with pet foods to the FDA Consumer Complaint Coordinator in their state. So, if your pet received any chicken … […]

    Pingback by Chicken Jerky and Onions? Greyt Inspirations Life | Everything 4 Pets Online! | January 9, 2009 | Reply

  3. […] A nice web master created an interesting post today on Chicken Jerky and Onions? Greyt Inspirations LifeHere’s a short outlinePack 30- Pads Adult Absorbency Maximum ClearQuest from o. Pet Supplies, Dog Supplies, Cat Supplies, Pet Meds, Pet Medications & Pet Products ClearQuest Maximum Absorbency Puppy Pads- 30 Pack- ClearQuest Puppy and Adult Pads for dogs are. 30-pack (bag) 22″ x 23″ 100-pack (box) 22. ClearQuest Super Absorbency Puppy Pads- 30 Pack Pads, Maximum Absorbency Puppy Pads and Maximum Absorbency Adult Pads, each pad i. ClearQuest Maximum Absorbency Adult Pads- 30 ClearQuest Maximum Absorbency Puppy Pads- 30 pack 21.99. ClearQuest Maximum Absorbency Puppy Pads Puppy Mobile Toys Replacement Pack. 70 Ph Buffer Solution galore adult personals in carver. Nylabone Glow In The Dark Flexible Ball Small. Maximum Absorbency Adult Pads- 14 pack 29.99. Learn more about ClearQuest Maximum Absorbency Puppy Pads- 30 Pack by visiting our website. Kong Stuffn Senior Paste For Dogs 8 Oz. Popular Products Today we have launched our online pet store, with the purpose of. Elements of […] […]

    Pingback by Chicken Jerky and Onions? Greyt Inspirations Life | PRODUCTS 4 PETS | January 10, 2009 | Reply

  4. […] Someone I’ve heard of created an interesting post today on Chicken Jerky and Onions? Greyt Inspirations LifeHere’s a short outline(From the Orlando Sentinel’s Animal Crazy blog.) Veterinarians and consumers should report cases of animal illness associated with pet foods to the FDA Consumer Complaint Coordinator in their state. So, if your pet received any chicken … […]

    Pingback by Chicken Jerky and Onions? Greyt Inspirations Life | FISH TANK PRODUCTS | January 11, 2009 | Reply


Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: